Governor signs “License to Work” Act, ending driving suspensions for non-moving tickets

From Central Illinois Proud:

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WTVO) — Gov. JB Prizker eliminated driver’s license suspensions for non-moving violations on Friday, reinstating tens of thousands of licenses.

The new License to Work act removes the State’s ability to take a resident’s driver’s license as punishment for unpaid tickets, fines, and fees.

“Suspending licenses for having too many unpaid tickets or fines or fees doesn’t necessarily make a person pay the bill, but it does mean that the people who are suffering from this don’t have a way to pay,” Governor Pritzker said.

The Governor’s Office says more than 50,000 Illinois licenses are suspended each year because drivers can’t afford to pay the fines.

The new law takes effect on July 1st.

From the Illinois ACLU:

The License to Work Act would:

  • Eliminates driver’s license suspension as a penalty for most non-driving violations, including:
  1. Failing to pay parking, compliance, or tollway tickets, fines, or fees
  2. Being judged to be a “truant minor”
  3. Criminal trespass to a vehicle, and a handful of other non-driving violations
  • Allows an individual whose license was suspended under any of these provisions to have their license reinstated.

The License to Work Act would keep Illinoisans on the road so that they can continue to work and support their families.

IL Secretary of State to Extend Expiration Dates on Drivers Licenses, IDs and Registrations by 90 days

From WLDS.com:

Secretary of State Jesse White announced today that emergency rules have been filed to extend expiration dates on driver’s licenses, IDs, and vehicle registrations for at least 90 days after facilities reopen. The previous extension had been for 30 days. White said in a press release that he was hoping to alleviate the rush of customers visiting facilities once they reopen.

Following Governor Pritzker’s Stay-at-Home order, White closed Driver Services facilities to the public through April 30. White is encouraging residents to use services at cyberdriveillinois.com while the stay-at-home order is still currently in place. White says by using online service it will further help any further congestion at facilities when they reopen.

Gov. Pritzker signs into law bill to end license suspensions for unpaid parking tickets

From the Chicago Tribune:

Illinois will no longer suspend the licenses of drivers who fail to pay parking tickets and other fines beginning July 1 under a measure Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law Friday.

The secretary of state’s office also will reinstate the driving privileges of roughly 55,000 people who’ve had their licenses suspended over unpaid fines and fees unrelated to moving violations.

“Right now, tens of thousands of Illinoisans lose their licenses each year for reasons that have nothing to do with their ability to drive,” Pritzker said at a bill-signing event in Chicago’s Homan Square neighborhood.

Illinois no longer mailing vehicle emissions test notices

Thanks to our budget impasse, Illinois has stopped mailing vehicle emissions notices.  This comes on top of its previous decision to stop sending vehicle registration renewal notices.

From the Daily Herald (story by Erin Hegarty):

As another casualty of the state budget impasse, Illinois will no longer remind you when you need to go for vehicle emissions testing, the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday.

This comes on top of the state suspending mailing residents reminders that their vehicle registration is expiring, a move Secretary of State Jesse White said could save $450,000 a month.

The state stopped sending the emissions testing notices in December and says drivers whose license plates expire in March will be the first to not receive the reminder notices.

Of course, it’s simple to look at the sticker on your license plate to figure out when your registration expires, but how will you know when your vehicle needs an emissions test?

The state EPA says most vehicles that need to be tested in 2016 include those with an even model-year from 1996 to 2012. The agency also says most vehicles manufactured after 1996 are subject to an emissions test after they are four years old.

Diesel and electric vehicles are among those the IEPA says are exempt from emissions testing.

Illinois residents can sign up for vehicle registration reminders via email at www.ilsos.gov/greenmail/, and drivers are notified whether a vehicle emissions test is required before the registration is renewed.