Illinois prohibits smoking in a car with children inside

Governor Pritzker has signed into law a new bill that makes it illegal to smoke inside a motor vehicle with children present.

Here is a link to the new legislation.

625 ILCS 5/11-1432 Prohibit smoking in a motor vehicle with a minor present.

  • “Smoke” means to inhale, exhale, burn, or carry a lighted cigarette, cigar, pipe, weed, plant, regulated narcotic, or other combustible substance.
  • Motorcycles not included.
  • A person shall not smoke in a motor vehicle, whether it is in motion or at rest, if a person under 18 years of age is in the vehicle, regardless of whether the vehicle’s windows are open. This subsection does not apply to a person who is the sole occupant of a vehicle.
  • A police officer may not stop or detain a motor vehicle or its driver nor inspect or search the vehicle, the contents of the vehicle, or the operator or passenger of the vehicle solely for a violation or suspected violation.
  • Petty offense not to exceed $100 and, for a second or subsequent offense, a fine not to exceed $250.

Illinois one of toughest states for speeding, reckless driving according to study

From WJBC.com:

Illinois’ police forces may not give out the most speeding tickets but when they do, state laws make them some of the most expensive in the nation.

A new report by financial service company WalletHub found that Illinois comes down the harder on speeders than nearly any other state but it has some of the harshest penalties in the nation. It was tied with three other states for eighth-strictest overall and fourth in terms of speeding enforcement, behind only Virginia, Arizona and New Mexico. It ranked fourth in the nation in terms of WalletHub’s “speeding enforcement” rankings. That’s based on threshold for an automatic reckless driving ticket, average hike in insurance premium after a ticket, and how much a speeding ticket counts toward a suspension.

WalletHub Analyst Jill Gonzalez said one ticket in Illinois gets a speeder much closer to a license suspension than other states.

“It has about 45 percent in terms of how much a speeding ticket counts toward a suspension,” she said. “Usually, a ticket is 15 percent counted toward a suspension.”

Illinois also ranked high on the list because of the long jail sentences and costly fines for reckless driving.

“Illinois has some of the highest days in jail after a first conviction at ten days and 20 for a second and the fines are some of the most expensive in the country as well,” Gonzalez said.

Read the full story here:  http://www.wjbc.com/2018/07/12/study-finds-illinois-doles-out-some-the-toughest-penalties-for-driving-offenses/