Chicago Police will be conducting DUI enforcement on the North Side Saturday night

According to a Press Report from the Chicago Police:

The Chicago Police Department will be conducting a DUI Saturation Patrol in the Lincoln (020th) District this weekend. The DUI Saturation Patrol will commence at 7:00 p.m. on Saturday, August 12th, 2017 and end at 3:00 a.m. on Sunday, August 13th, 2017.  The purpose of this program is to saturate a pre-designated area with roving police officers that continually monitor vehicular traffic for signs of impaired driving. Patrols also place emphasis on speed, alcohol-related and safety belt
violations. Police vehicles equipped for speed detection are deployed to apprehend speeding violators.

 

From DNAInfo:

Police officers will be on the lookout for drunken drivers and speeders Saturday night during a DUI Strike Force Patrol planned for North Side neighborhoods including Lincoln Square, Uptown and Andersonville.

Officers will also be looking for people not wearing seatbelts and other violations.

The strike force patrol will run from 7 p.m. Saturday-3 a.m. Sunday, throughout the Lincoln Police District.

Headquartered at 5400 N. Lincoln Ave., the district is bounded by Lake Michigan, the Chicago River, Lawrence and Peterson avenues.

Communities served by the district include Lincoln Square, Uptown, Edgewater, Andersonville, Bowmanville and Budlong Woods.

Elmhurst Police to conduct Roadside Safety Checks Saturday night

From the Patch:

On Saturday, Aug. 12, a roadside safety checkpoint will take place on a major roadway in Elmhurst, according to the release. The safety checkpoint will begin at 11:30 p.m. on Saturday night and continue until 3:30 a.m. on Sunday morning. During the safety checkpoint, vehicles will be stopped at a predetermined interval and checked for violations.

DUI Crackdown Coming To The South Side This Weekend – Bridgeport – DNAinfo Chicago

https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20170323/bridgeport/dui-crackdown-bridgeport-deering-district-saturation-patrol-drunken-driving?utm_source=Bridgeport%2C+Chinatown+%26+McKinley+Park&utm_campaign=1b64a320a9-Mailchimp-CHI&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_26fa4e0537-1b64a320a9-173124569

Expect Heightened DUI Patrols Super Bowl Weekend

Police reports are gearing up for an expected uptick of drunk drivers this weekend.

From the Chicago Police:

The Chicago Police Department is conducting DUI Saturation Patrols in the Wentworth (2nd) and Near West (12th) Districts this weekend. The DUI Saturation Patrol in the Wentworth (2nd) District will commence at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, February 3, 2017 and end at 3:00 a.m. on Saturday, February 4, 2017. The DUI Saturation Patrol in the Near West (12th) District will begin at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 4, 2017 and end at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday, February 5, 2017.
The Illinois State Police will be out in force as well:

The Illinois State Police Department says they are increasing patrols for super bowl weekend to crack down on drunk drivers.

State troopers will also be on the lookout for speeding seat belts and distracted driving.

Public safety officer Sean Ramsey says you won’t just see state police out on the highway.

“We can be on the interstate, state routes, in town,” Illinois State Police Trooper Sean Ramsey said. “So really they have the latitude to go where they want. Where they think that these violations may be occurring.”

The Cook County Sheriff has also announced that it will be conducting heightened efforts:

Cook County Sheriff’s Police are scheduled to conduct enhanced patrols this weekend, Sheriff Thomas J. Dart announced today.

Sheriff’s Police are conducting countywide DUI enforcement patrols today, Saturday and Sunday nights. They will also be on the lookout for those violating seatbelt laws, today, Saturday and Monday.

The Lake County Sheriff’s Office will conduct special traffic patrols this Super Bowl weekend, cracking down on alcohol-impaired drivers, drug-impaired drivers, and those not wearing their seatbelts.

Buffalo Grove police will be out in force this Super Bowl weekend, cracking down on seat belt law violators and alcohol and drug-impaired drivers.

Department officials announced the beefed up patrol efforts last week, reminding residents, “If you plan on drinking alcohol while cheering on your team, pass your keys to a sober driver before the Super Bowl party begins.”

The initiative coincides with the statewide “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign.

Other police departments will be out as well.  Please be safe and don’t drink and drive!

Chicago Police to conduct DUI saturation patrol Saturday night

From a Chicago Police Department Press release:

DUI SATURATION PATROL – JEFFERSON PARK (016th) DISTRICT

The Chicago Police Department will be conducting a DUI Saturation Patrol in the Jefferson Park (016th) District this weekend. The DUI Saturation Patrol will commence at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 17, 2016 and end at 2:00 a.m. on Sunday, December 18, 2016.

The purpose of this program is to saturate a pre-designated area with roving police officers that continually monitor vehicular traffic for signs of impaired driving. Patrols also place emphasis on speed, alcohol-related and safety belt violations. Police vehicles equipped for speed detection are deployed to apprehend speeding violators.

In addition, the Breath Alcohol Testing (BAT) Mobile Unit may also be deployed to allow officers to expedite the process of charging a person with Driving under the Influence (DUI) prior to transporting an alleged into the nearest lockup for bonding. The mobile unit also allows

for Individual Recognizance Bonds (I-Bonds) to be issued at the site of the DUI Saturation Patrol.

It should be noted that last week’s “saturation patrol” in the Albany Park District yielded only one DUI arrest.  Is it a waste of time and money?  What do you think?

DUI, Race and the Chicago Suburbs

There has been a viral facebook post by Brian Crooks about growing up black in suburban Naperville.  So far, it has garnered over 25,000 shares.  Please read it.

I wanted to excerpt part of it about the numerous DUI and other traffic investigatory stops that he endured, because the key to solving our current policing crisis is through listening and understanding:

I got pulled over a lot in high school. Like, a lot a lot. By this point, I was no longer driving the Dodge. I had a Mazda of my own. It was flashy and loud, but this was 2002 and everybody with a Japanese car was doing a Vin Diesel impression, so it’s not like mine stood out that much more than anyone else’s. I spent a ton of money on my car and was especially aware of its appearance. You can understand, then, why it was weird that I was routinely pulled over for a busted taillight. After all, that’s the kind of thing I would’ve noticed and gotten fixed, especially if that taillight tended to burn out once a week or so. My parents had told me how to act when pulled over by the police, so of course I was all “Yes sir, no sir” every time it happened. That didn’t stop them from asking me to step out of the car so they could pat me down or search for drugs, though. I didn’t have a drop of alcohol until I was 21, but by that point I was an expert at breathalyzers and field sobriety tests. On occasion, the officer was polite. But usually, they walked up with their hand on their gun and talked to me like I’d been found guilty of a grisly homicide earlier in the day. A handful of times, they’d tell me to turn off the car, drop the keys out the window, and keep my hands outside the vehicle before even approaching…

Once, when I came home from college, I was pulled over less than a block from my parents’ house. It was late, probably about midnight or so, but I hadn’t been drinking and it was winter so I wasn’t speeding because it had snowed that day. The officer stepped out of his car with his gun drawn. He told me to drop the keys out the window, then exit the car with my hands up and step back toward him. I knew he was wrong, but I wasn’t about to be shot to death down the street from my parents’ house because my failure to immediately comply was interpreted as me plotting to murder that officer. So yeah, I stepped out and backed up toward the officer. He hand cuffed me and refused to tell me why I had been pulled over, or why I had been asked to exit my vehicle. Only when I was sitting in the back of the police car did he tell me that there had been reports of gang activity in the area and that a car fitting my car’s description with a driver fitting my description had recently been involved in said gang activity. Gang activity. In south Naperville. Committed by a Black male driving a bright blue Mazda MX-6 with a gaudy blue and white interior. Yeah, alright. He was very short in asking me what I was doing in the neighborhood so late at night. I explained that my parents lived at that house with the glass backboard over there. He didn’t believe me. He took me back out of the car and put me face down on the hood of the police car to frisk me. I’d already been searched once before he put me in the car. Then, he spent about 15 minutes searching my car while I stood hand cuffed in the cold. My ID had my parents’ address on it, but he still didn’t think I lived there. I could tell he wanted to accuse me of having a fake ID. About a half hour after being pulled over, when he found nothing on me, nothing in my car, and nothing on my record, he reluctantly let me go. He didn’t even say sorry, or explain that it was his mistake; he must’ve been looking for another Black man in a bright blue Mazda MX-6 who was a gang leader in south Naperville. He sat in the street until I drove to my parents’ house, opened the garage door, drove inside, and then closed the garage door.

By the way, for the younger readers, I want to make it clear that having stories like this in the public conversation is not a new thing. When I was a young man in the 1980’s I read plenty of accounts of “driving while black.”  Perhaps the most memorable news item in this vein this was from 2000 when it became a temporary news story when it was revealed that Highland Park, IL police officers admitted that “they were taught to spot Mexican drivers to pull over by looking for large hats. A radio dispatch transcript submitted as evidence includes a Highland Park officer saying, “We got a winner,” after a sombrero sighting.” – Chicago Tribune story from March 31, 2000.  But then after a few weeks or months, stories like this pass away and nothing gets done.

I have said this before on this blog, but I will say it again.  DUIs are a very easy crime to fake.  They are also good tools for police departments that want to harass “unwanted” characters to keep them out of town.  All it takes for a DUI arrest is an officer’s “opinion” that a person was intoxicated because had “bloodshot eyes” and an “odor of alcohol.”  They can not offer a breath test and claim that the defendant “refused.”  It is also easy to make up probable cause for a drug or gun stop.  Let’s say an officer suspects someone is dealing drugs.  He can conduct a stop and frisk.  If there are no drugs, you walk away..If there are drugs, then you say you saw it in “plain sight.”  Or you can create some probable cause by heading straight to the suspected dealer and getting him to make a “furtive move” or run away.

This is not to say that this happens every time, but keep it in mind when you hear that someone was arrested for DUI.  Ask the critical questions:  why were they stopped?  what evidence is there?  Is there video evidence?

This is why video evidence is so crucial.  It is frustrating to me that even in 2016, it is common to have DUI, drug and weapons cases without any corroborating dash cam or body cam video evidence.  This should be mandatory.  Video evidence will often (if not always) establish whether the officer had probable cause, acted in a professional manner, and whether the defendant was violating the law or was just driving while black.

DUI Strike Force to target Bridgeport, Ogden this weekend

Last week, the Chicago Police Department’s DUI Strike Force was responsible for 129 citations.  One of them was for DUI.  Here is the link to their press release.

Yes, one.

Obviously, this is a big waste of police resources and a big source of harassment for motorists.

Nevertheless, they are back in force again this weekend.

From DNAInfoChicago (Kelly Bauer, reporting):

Police will crack down on drunken drivers in the Bridgeport-based Deering District this weekend.

Police will lead a DUI Strike Force Patrol from 7 p.m. Friday to 3 a.m. Saturday.

Officers will look for drivers who are drunk, speeding, not wearing their seat belts and other violations.

Oddly enough, this is not on the CPD’s official web site.  However, they do have a press release on their site about another patrol the following day:

The Chicago Police Department will be conducting a DUI Strike Force Patrol in the Ogden (10th) District this weekend. The DUI Strike Force Patrol will commence at 7:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 11, 2016 and end at 3:00 a.m. on Sunday, June 12, 2016.