One Cook County Corrections officer dead, another charged in fatal DUI crash

From the Patch:

WOODRIDGE, IL — A Cook County correctional officer is facing DUI charges after a Monday afternoon crash that killed 27-year-old fellow officer Zachary Perry. At around 4 p.m., Woodridge police, along with Romeoville and Bolingbrook police, responded to a crash involving a box truck and two passenger vehicles near Joliet and Davey roads.

Police said Perry, of Addison, was pronounced dead at the scene, Another driver, 30-year-old Pablo Perez of Berwyn, was taken to an area hospital and later charged with DUI.

Both Perry and Perez worked as corrections officers, according to WGN. Perez was de-deputized following the crash Monday pending an investigation, officials told the outlet.

Illinois State Police, Bolingbrook and Romeoville police, and the Felony Investigative Assistance Team (FIAT) are investigating the crash.

Perez is charged with one count of misdemeanor DUI and one count of felony aggravated DUI, according to Will County jail records.

 

Cook County pays out 3.25 million to woman assaulted in Markham lockup

From the Chicago Sun-Times:

Nine officers of the Cook County Sheriff’s Office are still on the payroll even though the county unanimously voted Wednesday to pay $3.25 million to a woman who was sexually assaulted on their watch in the lockup at the Markham Courthouse.

Cara Smith, chief policy adviser to Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart, said Wednesday that the office is seeking to terminate the officers, a decision that was made after an investigation by the Sheriff’s Office of Professional Review. The office was investigating how the woman came to be locked in a small cell with two men — and why none of the deputies assigned to the courtroom at the time noticed the assault as it was taking place.

…Last June, Hamidullah Tribble, 21, and Nelon Drake, 23, were charged with sexually assaulting the female inmate on May 2 in a holding cell adjacent to a courtroom in the south suburban courthouse.

Investigators with the sheriff’s office found that Tribble, “under the guise that he needed to use the toilet,” had sheriff’s officers escort him from his cell to another one nearby that had a bathroom — where the victim was located at the time. It was in the bathroom that Tribble allegedly committed the sexual assault.

Once Tribble was returned to his cell, Drake, who was held in the same one, also told sheriff’s officers he had to use the bathroom, records show. He was taken to the same one, where the woman remained. Once inside, “he had [the victim] perform an act of oral sex on him.”

…The Office of Professional Review found that the four named officers violated several sheriff’s office policies and standards. The complaints against them — all of which were sustained — cited: Inattention to duty, failure to follow policy and procedure, failure to report an incident, neglect of duty, falsifying a report, conduct unbecoming and being less than truthful, records show.

Read the whole story here:  https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/sheriff-moves-to-fire-9-officers-after-sex-assault-of-inmate-in-lockup/amp/?utm_source=Chicago%20Sun-Times&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=1960368_morningedition111617&ID=1960368_morningedition111617&dm_i=2JCP,160MO,7FJHLL,3MOXE,1

Was a Newsweek expose on brutality at Cook County Jail suppressed?

An inmate who alleged he had been beaten by Cook County deputies. Photo by Peter van Agtmael

Prison Photography blog has an intriguing story about a possible attempt to kill a story about abuses at Cook County Jail.  Here is a quote:

In April 2011, Peter van Agtmael was assigned by Newsweek to photograph Tom Dart, the Sheriff of Cook County, Chicago, Illinois. The coverage involved one day’s access to Cook County Jailand day of access to the ride-alongs with the PD. With a daily average of 11,000 inmates, Cook County Jail is the largest facility of detention in the U.S.

During his time in the jail, van Agtmael witnessed an altercation and heard allegations of abuse.

“The possibility of one more day of access to the jail was floated, but then didn’t come through.”

It is uncertain as to whether van Agtmael’s photographs of the contact between prisoner and deputy affected the decision to cancel the next day’s proposed visit. Van Agtmael isn’t even sure if it was Newsweek or the Sheriff’s department’s decision to cancel.

Newsweek consequently killed the story.

Read the whole story here.

This was brought to my attention by Los Angeles attorney Lowell Steiger.